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Historic England announces £744,000 funding to tell stories from ‘overlooked’ parts of the country

Funding for more than 50 creative projects to highlight working-class stories from ‘overlooked’ parts of the country has been announced by Historic England.

Fifty-seven projects will benefit from £774,000 split into grants ranging from £6,000 to £25,000, including those from West Yorkshire’s boxing clubs, Leicester’s hidden nightclub scene and 19th-century slaughterhouse girls of Deptford, East London.

Historic England said the money will further the ‘collective understanding of the past’ and ‘address the imbalance over which histories are remembered’.

The projects will take various forms, with some producing films, online articles, artwork and oral history recordings and others hosting celebratory events and exhibitions.

After an open call for applications in February, the 57 projects were selected from more than 500 proposals.

Among the criteria for successful bids were projects that provided volunteering opportunities for young people or those facing loneliness and isolation, and projects that contributed positively to participants’ wellbeing.

Funding for more than 50 creative projects to highlight working-class stories from ‘overlooked’ parts of the country has been announced by Historic England. Fifty-seven projects will benefit from £774,000 split into grants ranging from £6,000 to £25,000, including those from West Yorkshire’s boxing clubs, Leicester’s hidden nightclub scene and 19th-century slaughterhouse girls of Deptford, East London. Above: Clubbers in Leicester

the boxing project in Halifax, West Yorkshire, will raise £10,000 and will focus on the fighting gyms that were once common in the area.  Led by the boxing fraternity and young people, the project will produce filmed oral history interviews and maps of key sites as well as an exhibition and an events series.  Above: A more recent boxing bout in Halifax

the boxing project in Halifax, West Yorkshire, will raise £10,000 and will focus on the fighting gyms that were once common in the area. Led by the boxing fraternity and young people, the project will produce filmed oral history interviews and maps of key sites as well as an exhibition and an events series. Above: A more recent boxing bout in Halifax

Another project will examine the working-class histories of Bodmin, in Cornwall.  Above: Children examining sheep at Bodmin market in 1939

Another project will examine the working-class histories of Bodmin, in Cornwall. Above: Children examining sheep at Bodmin market in 1939

The charity 2Funky Arts (2FA) will use a £10,000 grant to explore 50 years of Leicester’s night life.

The focus will be on the city’s black community, and genres including hip hop, soul, reggae and jazz, whilst 45 volunteers will create a pop-up exhibition featuring old photographs and personal anecdotes.

One photo shows people dancing at Bailey’s nightclub at Leicester’s Haymarket Centre.

The project looking at Deptford’s slaughterhouses will get £11,000 of funding. More than 500 women worked in the area’s cattle markets at the end of the 19th century.

The young women had a reputation for raucous behavior and were nicknamed the ‘gut girls’.

The project will be led by Capture Art & Creative Projects Ltd, in partnership with The Albany arts center and Deptford Library.

It will work with young people to produce arts and crafts and photography looking at the working-class history in the area, with specific focus on the largely untold legacy of the ‘gut girls’.

Meanwhile, the boxing project in Halifax, West Yorkshire, will raise £10,000 and will focus on the fighting gyms that were once common in the area.

A project in County Durham will get £10,000 to examine thstories of those who worked at Easington Colliery (pictured) and will also look at the lives of the area's residents

A project in County Durham will get £10,000 to examine thstories of those who worked at Easington Colliery (pictured) and will also look at the lives of the area’s residents

The project looking at Deptford's slaughterhouses will get £11,000 of funding.  More than 500 women worked in the area's cattle markets at the end of the 19th century.  Above: The warehouse in Deptford where cattle markets were held

The project looking at Deptford’s slaughterhouses will get £11,000 of funding. More than 500 women worked in the area’s cattle markets at the end of the 19th century. Above: The warehouse in Deptford where cattle markets were held

The project in Bodmin will use previously unseen photographs of buildings and people to inspire modern residents to explore the town's history.  Above: A photo showing British troops training in a disused warehouse in Bodmin in 1939

The project in Bodmin will use previously unseen photographs of buildings and people to inspire modern residents to explore the town’s history. Above: A photo showing British troops training in a disused warehouse in Bodmin in 1939

A project in North Yorkshire that is getting £11,000 of funding will look at the stories of disabled people who were inmates or staff at Ripon Workhouse from the Victorian era until the 1940s.  Pictured: The former workhouse is now a museum

A project in North Yorkshire that is getting £11,000 of funding will look at the stories of disabled people who were inmates or staff at Ripon Workhouse from the Victorian era until the 1940s. Pictured: The former workhouse is now a museum

Meanwhile, the history of a chapel made from tin in the Forest of Dean will be examined in a project getting £10,000 of funding.  The Bilson Mission chapel was built in 1880 as a place of worship for local gypsies

Meanwhile, the history of a chapel made from tin in the Forest of Dean will be examined in a project getting £10,000 of funding. The Bilson Mission chapel was built in 1880 as a place of worship for local gypsies

Led by the boxing fraternity and young people, the project will produce filmed oral history interviews and maps of key sites as well as an exhibition and an events series.

A project in Bodmin, Cornwall will connect communities to the working-class histories of the area. It will get £8,000 of funding.

It will use previously unseen photographs of buildings and people to inspire modern residents to explore the town’s history.

A project in North Yorkshire that is getting £11,000 of funding will look at the stories of disabled people who were inmates or staff at Ripon Workhouse from the Victorian era until the 1940s.

Meanwhile, the history of a chapel made from tin in the Forest of Dean will be examined in a project getting £10,000 of funding. The Bilson Mission chapel was built in 1880 as a place of worship for local gypsies.

Duncan Wilson, chief executive of Historic England, said: ‘I’m excited to see the wide range of creative approaches and subjects proposed for Everyday Heritage Grants: Celebrating Working Class Histories.

‘These community-led projects demonstrate that heritage is all around us and accessible to everyone. They will highlight that wherever people live they are surrounded by historic buildings, landscapes and streets, industrial and coastal heritage that can help bring communities together.’

Heritage minister Nigel Huddleston said: ‘This inclusive and accessible project clearly demonstrates that heritage belongs to all of us.

‘This is a fantastic initiative that will help communities from across England engage with the working-class heritage in their area in new and exciting ways and see these untold stories being put into the spotlight.’

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