Skip to content

Max Boxing – News – Lou Diibello card celebrates return of Hall of Fame

Lou DiBella was about to be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame and fittingly promoted the celebratory card at the vast and endlessly Turning Stone Casino in Verona, NY, on 10/6/22. The show developed young talent, featured a couple of upsets, provided an entertaining mix of bouts good and bad, and was carried on ShoBox.

A good crowd of some 3000 filled the lower deck of the arena. Ray Flores did the announcing and Bob Caico kept time.

If weirdness counts, the main event was a classic. Bakhodir Jalolov, 251, Sariosiyo, Uzbekistan, 11-0 (11), faced Jack Mulowayi, 242, a Congolese fighting out of Merksem, Belgium, 11-3-1 (7), in a clash of heavyweight hopefuls. Mulowayi trudged relentlessly forward but barely landed a clean punch. The outrageously lanky southpaw Jalolov threw virtually nothing but lead lefts with KO stamped on them. Like an Old West shootout, there was seemingly no thought of a victory points. And Bakhodir nearly succeeded as early as the second. Mulowayi was repeatedly speared by long lead lefts until he was tottering in several directions at once. He desperately grabbed Jalolov, trying to stay erect, and was tossed to the canvas. Referee Benjy Esteves did not call a knockdown, although Jack was seriously rocked, and the Congolese made it out of the round. If Mulowayi had worked inside effectively, it might have been a different fight. But he couldn’t. Jalolov used his long arms like an octopus, and in the fourth, Benjy penalized him for holding. With KO never more than punch away, the fight remained tense and entertaining. But there was virtually nothing else going on. When would Mulowayi walk into a finisher? That was it.

In the sixth, Bakhodir started fighting with hands down, to open up the trading, while both fighters engaged in taunting. The round ended with Jack missing a wild punch and lurching forward, where Bakhodir clipped him with a left to the back of the head that sent him down at the bell. Jalolov landed some punishers in the ensuing round, but speculation now began to rise that Mulowayi would be the first man to last the distance. That ended spectacularly in the final round! In the midst of a mad scramble, Jalolov put two lead lefts together and stretched Mulowayi out cold, flat on his back from him. There was some concern for him amidst the celebrating and a cheer of relief went up when he revived and got unsteadily to his feet. KO at 1:20.

While the top bout was all offense, the co-feature was anything but. George Arias, 219 ½, Bronx, 18-0 (7), faced Alante Green, 223, Cleveland, 10-1-1 (7), in a masterpiece of ineffective jockeying. Fighting out of a squared stance, Arias came out dancing and circling wide while the muscular, flat-footed Green marched after him. The second was all jockeying for position, with little trading. Arias established a jab in the third, which Green tried to nullify by forcing him to the ropes. George came back with slapping left hooks inside to take the round. Alante changed tactics in the fourth by going southpaw, which George tried to smother by forcing his way inside, resulting in a tame round. The fifth was rugged but ragged, with Green leaning on Arias and working inside. The sixth followed the pattern but the seventh saw the contest move back outside again, with Green at southpaw. The eighth was the only conclusive round of the fight, with action at long range, Green fighting lefty and popping away while George just posed. The last two rounds made it appear that Alante had pulled it out. Don Trella agreed, 77-75. But Eric Marlinski and Tom Shreck edged the split decision to Arias, 77-75 and 78-74 respectively, possibly on style points. It was hardly a conclusive victory, but a win is a win. Charlie Fitch refereed.

The third eight had Tyler Tomlin, 134, Cheatham County, TN, 13-1 (9), facing Chann Thomson, 132 ½, Montreal, 11-1 (8), in a bristling good scrap. Tyler moved forward effectively to force the fight while Chann circled away with snappy footwork, looking for counters. Tomlin put over sneak rights to edge the first two. Action further escalated in the heated third when Chann began letting his hands go. He jarred Tyler with a sneak right and then rocked him in a closing rally with another big right and a left-right combination. The fourth was action packed and a see-saw round. Chann started with body-head combinations, then Tyler began to take over the action from long range.

But Thomson closed fast, bloodying Tomlin’s nose and jolting him in closing action. The exciting contest ended abruptly in the fifth. Ref Mark Nelson suspended the action and took Tomlin to the doctor, who stopped the bout; TKO at 1:01. Fans were disappointed, as it had been a cracking good fight.

Amron Sands, 282, Orlando, 12-2 (9), scored a mild upset of Joe Jones, 210, Jersey City, 13-5 (10), in an interesting but somewhat lackluster eight. Jones was giving away a lot of weight to the somewhat out-of-shape Sands. But that wasn’t the problem. Joe didn’t have any idea how to fight a southpaw. The rounds were dull and listless, but with Sands forcing what action there was while Jones stood around observing. Joe was in some distress in the sixth from lefts to the body, some borderline low. He showed some life in the seventh, fought aggressively and won the round, but lapsed back into inactivity to close the show. Marlinski, Shreck and Trella all scored 77-75 Sands. Ref, Benjy.

By contrast, a good fight was a scheduled eight between Charles Foster, 173, New Haven, 21-0 (11), and Bo Gibbs Jr., 172 ½, Carney, OK, 23-3 (9). Gibbs was down quickly in the first when he tried to duck inside and got clipped on the back of the head by a one-two thrown from southpaw. I have protested a rabbit punch to ref Fitch, then regrouped and rallied late. Bo landed some good rights early in the second, but Foster began to get his fight together in a strong third and then snapped Bo’s head with a big left that had him out on his feet, where the ref stopped it, at 2:48 of the fourth.

Oshae Jones, 147 ¾, Toledo, debuted successfully against sturdy Sonya Dreiling, 147 ¾, Ft. Wayne, AL, 4-3-2 (2), in a good six (two min.). Jones began firing sharp combos in the second and had Sonya on the run at the bell. Dreiling suffered a bloody nose in the third and was battered by crisp one-twos in the final round. All scores 60-54. Ref, Nelson.

Debuting Nicolas Tejada, 144 ¼, Haverhill, MA, stopped Mike Taylor, 145 ¾, Syracuse, 0-4, in 2:10 of the second, scheduled four. Tejada placed his punches well and put them together until a series of solid right uppercuts had Taylor slumped over at the waist in surrender and Fitch stopped it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.